Centre Updates

Now hiring more than 30 researchers and students

With $83 million of new commercial backing and in partnership with recently formed company Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd, we are seeking 20 researchers, engineers and technicians from industry and academia to accelerate the commercialisation of our world-leading research in silicon quantum electronics. More than 10 PhD positions are also available.

View the full list of available roles.

Dr Jacq Romero named L'Oréal Australia women in science fellow

Dr Jacq Romero, a researcher in CQC2T's photonic quantum computation program at the University of Queensland, has been named one of five L'Oréal Australia women in science fellows. Romero was recognised for her work creating quantum “alphabets” using the orbital angular momentum of light.

CQC2T congratulates Dr Romero and the four other fellows.

See the full list of fellows in Cosmos Magazine

Learn more about Dr Romero's work

Large-scale quantum circuitry challenges can be overcome for electron spin qubits in quantum dots or donors

Prof Andrew Dzurak and Prof Andrea Morello have contributed to a review of approaches to quantum circuitry for semiconductor spin qubits showing that electron spin qubits in quantum dots or donors offer several opportunities to overcome the challenge of wiring up large qubit arrays.


Sparse qubit array with local electronics

The review was published in npj Quantum Information and concludes that continuous development of semiconductor technology is paving the way for the construction of a large-scale universal quantum computer.

Read the full article in npj Quantum Information

CQC2T partner explains motivation for quantum computing investment

Telstra's Chief Scientist Professor Hugh Bradlow explains the telco giant's commitment to becoming a world class technology company in this piece for Exchange. The company's long-term approach has seen it invest in Australia's first quantum computing company, Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd.

Guests tour UNSW's quantum computing laboratories at the launch of Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd

The company is a first-of-its-kind collaboration between UNSW, the Commonwealth and NSW governments, Commonwealth Bank Australia and Telstra. CQC2T Director Prof Michelle Simmons is a founding member of the company board.

Read more at the Telstra Exchange

CQC2T researchers are connecting up the global quantum internet

A team of researchers led by A. Prof Matthew Sellars at The Australian National University have shown that an erbium-doped crystal is a practical building block for a global quantum internet.

Dr Rose Ahlefeldt and A. Prof Matthew Sellars operating a high resolution dye laser (used to study rare earth crystals) in the solid state spectroscopy laboratory at ANU. Image credit: Stuart Hay, ANU

The material is uniquely suited to enable a global quantum telecommunications network, achieving coherence times of more than a second and operating in the same 1550nm band as existing fibre optic networks.

Read more

Access the full paper at Nature Physics.

Watch a video about the result.

Australia's first quantum computing company launched

Australia's first quantum computing company, Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd, has been formed to accelerate the commercialisation of silicon quantum computing technology initially developed by CQC2T.

SQC board members with the federal Industry Minister and NSW Chief Scientist. L to R: CBA Head of Emerging Technology Dilan Rajasingham, Telstra Chief Scientist Professor Hugh Bradlow, Secretary of the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science Glenys Beauchamp, Minister for for Industry, Innovation and Science the Hon Arthur Sinodinos AO, Professor Michelle Simmons, SQC Chair Stephen Menzies, NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer Professor Mary O'Kane, UNSW Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Jacobs

The company is a first-of-its-kind collaboration between UNSW, the Commonwealth and NSW governments, Commonwealth Bank Australia and Telstra. CQC2T Director Prof Michelle Simmons is a founding member of the company board.

Read more at the UNSW Newsroom

Watch a video showing highlights from the launch

CQC2T researchers propose new type of qubit

Prof Andrea Morello and his team at UNSW has developed a new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel ‘flip-flop qubits’, that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically easier.

Artist's impression of the 'flip-flop' qubits exhibiting quantum entanglement. Tony Melov/UNSW

“What the team have invented is a new way to define a ‘spin qubit’ that uses both the electron and the nucleus of the atom. Crucially, this new qubit can be controlled using electric signals, instead of magnetic ones," said Prof Morello.

Read more at the UNSW Newsroom

Access the full paper at Nature Communications.

Quantum sheds new light on electron spin resonance techniques

A team led by CQC2T's Prof Lloyd Hollenberg at the University of Melbourne have demonstrated a dramatically improved electron spin resonance technique using the quantum properties of diamond.

Electron spin image of copper (II) ions in a patterned region of the diamond defined by the kangaroo. The scale bar in the image is 10 micrometers. Image credit: David Simpson

Hollenberg led an interdisciplinary team that improved the sensitivity of ESR by orders of magnitude compared to existing techniques using a non-invasive method. The technology will be used to understand biochemistry and could reveal how transition metal ions affect brain health.

Read more at Eurekalert.

Access the full paper at Nature Communications.

Researchers find quantum computations could be hidden

CQC2T's Dr Nick Menicucci is part of a team that have proposed cloud-based quantum computers could be used remotely without revealing the user's purpose and without the user having access to their own quantum resources.

Towards classically driven blind quantum computation. Credit: Timothy Yeo/Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore

The work, published in Physical Review X, was part of a collaboration with researchers from the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and the Singapore University of Technology and Design. The team propose that concealing which steps in a series perform the desired calculation would be akin to hiding a needle in a haystack.

Read more at EurekAlert!

Access the full paper at Physical Review X.

Quantum probes dramatically improve detection of nuclear spins

CQC2T researchers at the University of Melbourne have demonstrated a way to detect nuclear spins non-invasively using quantum technology, providing a new tool for materials science and biotechnology.

A nitrogen-vacancy (dark blue) quantum probe performing nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on molecular hydrogen. A green laser controls the quantum state of the probe, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of target nuclear spins. The probe responds to the nuclear spins of the hydrogen atoms and provides a direct measurement via the red light emitted. Image credit: David A. Broadway/cqc2t.org

The team, led by CQC2T Deputy Director Prof Lloyd Hollenberg, has used a quantum probe to perform microwave-free nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at the nanoscale. The new technique overcomes significant limitations with existing approaches.

Read more at EurekAlert!

Access the full paper at Nature Communications.